ElectionGudie

July 2, 2016 Held

13,761,256
Voted
Australia

Commonwealth of Australia

Election for Australian Senate

Results

84%
Voter
Turnout*
Cast Votes:13,761,256
Valid Votes:13,166,407
Invalid Votes:594,849

Parties:

Party Seats Won Seats Change Votes

Australian Labor Party 25 - 4,123,084

29.79%

The Greens 6 - 1,197,657

8.65%

Liberal Party 20 - 1,066,579

7.71%

Liberal National Party 4 - 960,467

6.94%

One Nation 1 - 593,013

4.29%

Nick Xenophon Team 3 - 456,369

3.30%

Liberal Democrats - - 298,915

2.16%

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party - - 266,607

1.93%

Family First Party - - 191,112

1.38%

Christian Democratic Party - - 162,155

1.17%

Animal Justice Party - - 159,373

1.15%

Jacqui Lambie Network 1 - 69,074

0.50%

Country Liberal Party 1 - 37,156

0.25%

National Party of Australia 2 - 34,618

0.25%

Palmer United Party - - 26,210

0.19%

More Info:

Australia: Parliamentary Election, 2 July 2016

At stake in this election:

  • 76 seats in the Senate

Description of government structure:

  • Chief of State: Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952); represented by Governor General Sir Peter COSGROVE (since 28 March 2016)
  • Head of Government: Prime Minister Malcolm TURNBULL (since 15 September 2015)
  • Assembly: Australia has a bicameral Federal Parliament consisting of the Senate and House of Representatives. The Senate is composed of 76 seats and the House of Representatives has 150 seats.

Description of electoral system:

  • In the Senate, members are directly elected in multi-seat constituencies by proportional representation vote to serve 6-year terms. In the Senate, there are 12 members from each of the 6 states and 2 members from each of the 2 mainland territories. One-half of state membership is renewed every 3 years, and territory membership is renewed every 3 years.

Last Election:

  • Elections for the Senate were last held on 7 September 2013. The coalition of the Liberal Party and National Party won 17 seats, the Labor Party won 12, the Greens won 4 seats, and the Palmer United Party won 3. Additionally, several smaller parties and independent candidates won senate seats.

Note: Elections for half of the senate members are normally held every 3 years. However in this election, all seats of the Senate are at stake due to the full dissolution of the government.

Main parties in the election:

  • Liberal National Party[1]
    • Leader: Malcolm TURNBULL
    • Seats won in last election: 17
  • Australian Labor Party
    • Leader: Bill SHORTEN
    • Seats won in last election: 12
  • Australian Greens
    • Leader: Richard DI NATALE
    • Seats won in last election: 4
  • Palmer United Party
    • Leader: Clive PALMER
    • Seats won in last election: 3
  • Liberal Democratic Party
    • Leader: Gabriel BUCKLEY
    • Seats won in last election: 1
  • Family First Party
    • Leader: Bob DAY
    • Seats won in last election: 1
  • Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party
    • Leader: Ricky MUIR
    • Seats won in last election: 1
  • Nick Xenophon Group
    • Leader: Nick XENOPHON
    • Seats won in last election: 1

Population and number of registered voters:

·         Population: 22,751,014 (July 2015 est.)

·         Registered Voters: 14,722,754 (2013)

Gender Data:

·         Female Population: 11,343,812 (July 2015 est.)

·         Is Australia a signatory to CEDAW: Yes (17 July 1980)

·         Has Australia ratified CEDAW: Yes (28 July 1983)

·         Gender Quota: No[2]

·         Female candidates in this election:

·         Number of Female Parliamentarians: 68 (30.01%)[3]

·         Human Development Index Position: 2

·         Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI) Categorization: N/A

Disability Data:

·         Is Australia a signatory to CRPD: Yes (30 March 2007)

·         Has Australia ratified CRPD: Yes (17 July 2008)

·         Population with a disability: 3,412,652

 

[1] Last election, the Liberal party, National Party, the Liberal National Party of Queensland, and the Country Liberal Party ran as a coalition and won a combined total of 18 seats.

[2] There are no legislated quotas, but the Australian Labor Party has a 40% minimum quota for candidate lists.

[3] There are currently 39 women serving in the House of Representatives (26%) and 29 women in the Senate (38.16%).