ElectionGudie

Stakeholders of Libya’s February 17 Revolution

Dec. 28, 2011, 4:28 p.m.


The US Institute of Peace published a brief on the major stakeholders in post-Gaddafi Libya: the National Transitional Council, the February 17 Youth Movement, the Muslim Brotherhood, and ethnic and tribal groups. The report discusses competing and overlapping interests among these stakeholders and suggests ways to minimize conflict between these groups. The brief can be found here.


  • Who the rebels are in Libya has been a common question surrounding the revolution that overthrew Muammar Gadhafi. This report maps out the factions in Libya’s east, centering on Benghazi. It identifies the various groups, their narratives, their part in the revolution, and emergent grievances that could translate into instability or future conflicts.

  • Libyans share a strong sense of historical narrative and ownership of the recent revolution, but complexities lie within that ownership. There are tensions between the youth movement and the National Transitional Council; between local Libyans and returning members of the Libyan diaspora; between secular groups and religious ones, particularly the Muslim Brotherhood; within militia groups that did the fighting; and among Libya’s tribes and ethnic groups.

  • The widespread sense of ownership of the revolution, which kept morale high during the fighting, has translated to expectations of quick improvements, both overall and in people’s day-to-day lives. Managing expectations will be key to ensuring that tensions within Libyan society do not overcome the sense of unity that the revolution fostered.

  • International actors should ensure that local ownership of the political process remains at the fore and is not undermined. In addition, research is needed to understand the situation in Libya more clearly, in order to identify ways that the international community can support, aid, and advise local efforts in forming a stable and secure environment in Libya.

comments powered by Disqus